Ignore me, I’m ranting

onemuseleft:

You know what I like? Sexually confident Steve Rogers. Even if he’s a virgin, Steve’s not the kind of guy who’s going to be ashamed of sex. He’s in a committed relationship with someone he loves and finds desirable, anything they do together is going to be loving and consensual, and by god he’s going to try anything at least once if his partner wants him to. 

I want more Steve Rogers actually wanting sex from his partner instead of always being the one who tolerates Tony’s hormones. That’s not fun. I want Steve grabbing Tony’s butt when they pass each other in the kitchen, and I want Steve to like it when Tony grabs his. I want Steve slipping into Tony’s shower in the morning when they don’t have anywhere else to be in a hurry. I want Steve rolling over in the morning and asking for wake-up sex.

Because it’s one thing to be a blushing virgin but it’s another thing entirely to be ashamed of your body and Steve’s not going to have a relationship with someone he’s ashamed of wanting. And Steve’s not going to make his lover feel ashamed for wanting him. 

(via igavethatbitchalink)

cbecky1992:

thebigbadwolfe:

mechinism:

steve gets colorful when competitive

SUCK MY STAR-SPANGLED DICKS MOTHERFUCKERS

:-)

cbecky1992:

thebigbadwolfe:

mechinism:

steve gets colorful when competitive

SUCK MY STAR-SPANGLED DICKS MOTHERFUCKERS

:-)

(via igavethatbitchalink)

122,468 notes

Anonymous asked: sorry if this sounds rude but wouldn't steve's upbringing make him sort of ignorant about a lot of things? i think it makes sense that he would be on the conservative side...

dyionisiac:

ellidfics:

historicallyaccuratesteve:

ellidfics:

inaneenglish:

caroldanverz:

alright, anon, here’s what i think:

  • steve grew up in the 30s and 40s - right smack in the midst of the great depression.
  • he was the child of a poor, single, working mom who was also an irish-catholic immigrant - a group that was viciously persecuted and discriminated against at that time.
  • he had a variety of severe medical conditions that likely went untreated due to lack of health-care, and his mother died of pneumonia because of the same lack of health-care.
  • he was frequently beaten up and bullied because he stood up for himself and others when no one else would.
  • he volunteered to serve during the war because he so fervently believed in the cause he was fighting for and the people who needed his help and protection.

and then there’s stuff like this:

(from “man out of time” #3)

so basically, anon, i don’t agree with you at all.

he’s got his flaws, yeah, but steve would NOT be politically conservative. he would NOT be aligned with modern republican ideals, and he CERTAINLY would not be ignorant or insensitive to oppression, discrimination, inequality, or injustice.

in my opinion, anyone (or any narrative) that believes otherwise is completely missing the whole damn point of steve rogers.

FUCKING THANK YOU! I’m going to bookmark this to shove in people’s faces when they assume Steve would be conservative (hi, I have strong feelings about this). Also READ THIS ESSAY: "Steve Rogers Isn’t Just Any Hero" by Steven Attewell. Attewell grounds Steve Rogers in the political and social context of 1930s/40s America, making a flawless argument as to why Steve would be socially liberal.

Maybe it’s my upbringing that makes me think the whole idea of Steve being conservative is inaccurate and weird. My grandmother was a teenager during the Great Depression and a coal miner’s daughter. She’s a Democrat, in favor of government aid, and pro-union. Don’t assume that everyone from that time period is/was a raging conservative. Also, understand that the definitions of conservative and liberal have evolved drastically since the 1940s; however, I think it’s 100% accurate to claim that Steve Rogers would be a liberal by today’s standards.

No idea whether Steve voted in the 40’s (a lot of career military men of his generation *didn’t* until they retired since the military is under civilian control - and yes, that included General (later President) Eisenhower), but it’s canon that he supports gay rights (his best friend growing up was gay), same-sex marriage (he defends said best friend’s relationship with his partner as every bit as valid as his relationship with his girlfriend), civil rights, interracial/interspecies marriage, is proposed to by his girlfriends (who are uniformly strong, smart, and competent, not wilting little flowers), has a black superhero partner, has no animus against Communists, worked for the Federal Arts Project as an artist in the late 1930’s, and has repeatedly clashed with hard-right presidents and politicians (see also:  his resignation over the Marvel equivalent of Watergate, the Civil War, etc.).

Not only, but the one time that Captain America DID support right-wing causes, it wasn’t Steve Rogers.  It was William Burnside, the Captain America of the 1950’s, a fervent McCarthyite who took up the role while Steve Rogers was in the ice.  Even better, Burnside, who’d used a variant of the super soldier serum, went crazy, started attacking civil rights workers, and was yanked from the field.

My bet?  Captain America is not only a Democrat, he privately belongs to the Bernie Sanders/Elizabeth Warren wing of the party.  He doesn’t publicize this (“I’m supposed to symbolize the whole country, not just one party or group”) but when he goes into the voting booth in 2012, he votes straight ticket Democrat.

I think part of the reason that people have this image of “conservative Steve Rogers” is because the political make-up of the US changed drastically just after WWII. After the War, the “Threat of Fascism” was all but eradicated, and the new political enemy became the “Threat of Communism.” Prior to this shift in political enemies, communist and socialist political parties were fairly strong minor parties, and it was not uncommon for people to know (or be) members of one or the other. It’s not until after the War that Communism really became a “threat” to the American way of life.

And that’s history that Steve missed, because he was under the ice when that went down. He slept through the entire Cold War, which includes the division of Germany between East and West, the Iron Curtain, McCarthyism and the Red Scare, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the conflict in Afghanistan in the 1980s, the Iranian Revolution, the Chinese Civil War, the Chinese Cultural Revolution, and of course, the fall of the Berlin Wall, and the fall of the Iron Curtain. He has absolutely zero frame of reference for any of these events, because they occurred after he went down and before he woke up. The world changed significantly in those seventy years, not just in terms of technology and culture, but in politics and international relations.

And that, I think, is at least part of what he’s getting at when he tells Fury, “They say we won the war — they didn’t say what we lost.”

That may be why he seems to get along so well with Natasha, who after all is Russian, and why he doesn’t seem to have any problems at all with non-whites despite blatant and widespread racism in the United States when he was growing up.  He moved in liberal circles, probably knew anti-lynching and anti-racism advocates, and despite his hideous attempts at flirting with Peggy Carter, almost certainly knew feminists and women who did more than just stay home with the kids.

I’ve already reblogged this once, saying similar things to some of the commentators above, but I wanted to add something about women here.  (Fair warning Marxist language ahead)

The idea that women stay at home and don’t work is bourgeois as all hell. Steve grew up way to poor for anyone to not bring in an income.  Sarah Rogers was either a widow or the wife of a drunk depending on the version you use (MCU, 616, etc.)  In every version she works, either as a nurse (not a high education profession yet, think more like an orderly) or as a factory girl.  Even women with lots of children at home still did laundry or sewing for more well off families or single men.  

Even as a kid in school Steve is usually shown as a child laborer, either as a newsie, shop help, or a shoe shine boy. The massive economic boom following the war brought the idea that every (white) American family should be middle class, and therefore be able to afford a non-working parent.

This led to one of the well known problems of second wave feminism, which was concerned with middle class women getting middle class jobs, rather than fair pay for the largely WoC working poor, who had never had the option not to work.

(Also while Steve may not have voted DURING the war, he would have voted at least once Before it, and 99.9% likely to have been for FDR)

Steve Rogers and History

mikes-grrl:

This long and excellent multi-contributor post about Steve’s possible political leanings got me to thinking about why this discussion keeps coming up.

And yes, part of it is a lack of thorough history education in schools, which in America tend to focus inordinate time on A) The Revolution and…

Anonymous asked: sorry if this sounds rude but wouldn't steve's upbringing make him sort of ignorant about a lot of things? i think it makes sense that he would be on the conservative side...

ellidfics:

squeeful:

ellidfics:

historicallyaccuratesteve:

ellidfics:

inaneenglish:

caroldanverz:

alright, anon, here’s what i think:

  • steve grew up in the 30s and 40s - right smack in the midst of the great depression.
  • he was the child of a poor, single, working mom who was also an irish-catholic immigrant - a group that was viciously persecuted and discriminated against at that time.
  • he had a variety of severe medical conditions that likely went untreated due to lack of health-care, and his mother died of pneumonia because of the same lack of health-care.
  • he was frequently beaten up and bullied because he stood up for himself and others when no one else would.
  • he volunteered to serve during the war because he so fervently believed in the cause he was fighting for and the people who needed his help and protection.

and then there’s stuff like this:

(from “man out of time” #3)

so basically, anon, i don’t agree with you at all.

he’s got his flaws, yeah, but steve would NOT be politically conservative. he would NOT be aligned with modern republican ideals, and he CERTAINLY would not be ignorant or insensitive to oppression, discrimination, inequality, or injustice.

in my opinion, anyone (or any narrative) that believes otherwise is completely missing the whole damn point of steve rogers.

FUCKING THANK YOU! I’m going to bookmark this to shove in people’s faces when they assume Steve would be conservative (hi, I have strong feelings about this). Also READ THIS ESSAY: "Steve Rogers Isn’t Just Any Hero" by Steven Attewell. Attewell grounds Steve Rogers in the political and social context of 1930s/40s America, making a flawless argument as to why Steve would be socially liberal.

Maybe it’s my upbringing that makes me think the whole idea of Steve being conservative is inaccurate and weird. My grandmother was a teenager during the Great Depression and a coal miner’s daughter. She’s a Democrat, in favor of government aid, and pro-union. Don’t assume that everyone from that time period is/was a raging conservative. Also, understand that the definitions of conservative and liberal have evolved drastically since the 1940s; however, I think it’s 100% accurate to claim that Steve Rogers would be a liberal by today’s standards.

No idea whether Steve voted in the 40’s (a lot of career military men of his generation *didn’t* until they retired since the military is under civilian control - and yes, that included General (later President) Eisenhower), but it’s canon that he supports gay rights (his best friend growing up was gay), same-sex marriage (he defends said best friend’s relationship with his partner as every bit as valid as his relationship with his girlfriend), civil rights, interracial/interspecies marriage, is proposed to by his girlfriends (who are uniformly strong, smart, and competent, not wilting little flowers), has a black superhero partner, has no animus against Communists, worked for the Federal Arts Project as an artist in the late 1930’s, and has repeatedly clashed with hard-right presidents and politicians (see also:  his resignation over the Marvel equivalent of Watergate, the Civil War, etc.).

Not only, but the one time that Captain America DID support right-wing causes, it wasn’t Steve Rogers.  It was William Burnside, the Captain America of the 1950’s, a fervent McCarthyite who took up the role while Steve Rogers was in the ice.  Even better, Burnside, who’d used a variant of the super soldier serum, went crazy, started attacking civil rights workers, and was yanked from the field.

My bet?  Captain America is not only a Democrat, he privately belongs to the Bernie Sanders/Elizabeth Warren wing of the party.  He doesn’t publicize this (“I’m supposed to symbolize the whole country, not just one party or group”) but when he goes into the voting booth in 2012, he votes straight ticket Democrat.

I think part of the reason that people have this image of “conservative Steve Rogers” is because the political make-up of the US changed drastically just after WWII. After the War, the “Threat of Fascism” was all but eradicated, and the new political enemy became the “Threat of Communism.” Prior to this shift in political enemies, communist and socialist political parties were fairly strong minor parties, and it was not uncommon for people to know (or be) members of one or the other. It’s not until after the War that Communism really became a “threat” to the American way of life.

And that’s history that Steve missed, because he was under the ice when that went down. He slept through the entire Cold War, which includes the division of Germany between East and West, the Iron Curtain, McCarthyism and the Red Scare, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the conflict in Afghanistan in the 1980s, the Iranian Revolution, the Chinese Civil War, the Chinese Cultural Revolution, and of course, the fall of the Berlin Wall, and the fall of the Iron Curtain. He has absolutely zero frame of reference for any of these events, because they occurred after he went down and before he woke up. The world changed significantly in those seventy years, not just in terms of technology and culture, but in politics and international relations.

And that, I think, is at least part of what he’s getting at when he tells Fury, “They say we won the war — they didn’t say what we lost.”

That may be why he seems to get along so well with Natasha, who after all is Russian, and why he doesn’t seem to have any problems at all with non-whites despite blatant and widespread racism in the United States when he was growing up.  He moved in liberal circles, probably knew anti-lynching and anti-racism advocates, and despite his hideous attempts at flirting with Peggy Carter, almost certainly knew feminists and women who did more than just stay home with the kids.

Plus “staying home with the kids” is luxury only the middle class and up can afford, and even then it’s mostly a post-WWII 1950s affectation. Steve Rogers’ working class background and circle would not have been able to pass up a second income.  All of the women he would have come in contact with prior to his big sleep would have worked.

Not to mention that his MOTHER worked.  Thanks for pointing that out.

clinttbarton:

i fucking love whenever people are like “how would steve rogers react to the fact that people now curse and talk about sex?”

yo

he grew up as a poor orphan in Brooklyn and joined the fucking army i think he’s got that shit covered 

(via igavethatbitchalink)

12,068 notes

http://dubioussanity.tumblr.com/post/61272444129/seriously-though-guys-steve-is-not-an-idiot

dubioussanity:

Seriously though guys Steve is not an idiot.

I just hate when in fics the author portrays Steve as the fumbling idiot who doesn’t even know how to work the ‘cellular device’ Tony gave him and just walks around like ‘Tony I done goofed it up’ after he mashes his fingers all the screen. Jfc no.

(Source: officialcaptainamerica)

villa-kulla:

sometimes I laugh when Steve is written as this total goody-two-shoes who’s obsessed with discipline and following orders when basically the entire script of Captain America is: “steve don’t do the thing - ” “I’M GOING TO DO THE THING”

(via marielikestodraw)

10,708 notes

peggyleads:

maquisleader:

ihavealotoffeelings:

ykoriana:

magenmagenmagen:

chujo-hime:

cephiedvariable:

I feel a little asinine making a statement as broad and obvious as this, but the War changed the US and American culture substantially. Like, the US in 1939 was a very different place from the US in 1946. There was a shift in cultural values and political doctrine after WWII spurred on by the Cold War, justified by the oodles of money the country made off of weapons production and bolstered by the emerging popularity of television, which was used quite effectively as a tool of propaganda. I mean, a belief in American Imperialism had always been around in the US - as had theocratic Puritanical social mores - but their prominence in the late 40’s through to the early 60’s was not a progression of pre-War culture, but a reaction to America’s sudden position as THE Global Military and Economic Superpower.
The problem Avengers movie fandom seems to run into is that they place the cultural experience of Steve Rogers on the wrong side of the war. I’m guessing this is because people are generally more familiar with the atmosphere of post-War/50’s America due to a number of factors, from something as simple as the continued cultural relevance of 50’s pop media to the fact that the common historical narrative of the 20th century tends to place the 1960’s as the “radical turning point” in American culture, which often manages to undermine the radical movements of the five decades preceding it.
Long story short: I have found that Avengers fandom tends to portray Captain America’s “culture shock” in really weird ways, with him acting more like a sheltered kid from our modern conception of the 1950’s rather than someone who lived through the Great Depression, the New Deal, the rise of fascism in Europe, the various civil protest movements revolving around just about everything in American culture, the vicious public backlash against President Hoover… I mean, additionally there is the possibility that movie!Steve shares his 616 counterpart’s backstory as an art student, or at the very least was interested in art professionally (which the Cap movie did sort of cutely underline) and I just… cannot buy that an orphaned fine arts student living in New York of all places in the late 30’s/early 40’s would be at all ~shocked and appalled~ by the vast majority of modern social mores and allowances?? Like “oh no people have sex all the time in 2012??” “wow it’s so strange that people just get angry at the president all the time??” Those things were not uncommon in the 1940s.
Which covers “socially and politically”. As for technologically… well, yeah, things HAVE changed a lot, but that rapid change began during the time period he lived in. I mean, computers are crazy sure, but it’s kind of silly to think that 2012’s technology would be completely brain breaking to someone from the recent past. A significant period of adjustment might be required, but he’d probably catch on to things like Microwaves and word processing programs p. quickly. Especially since we aren’t even talking about the real past, here. We are talking about COMIC BOOK HISTORY in which Captain America fought Nazis who had CRAZY ALIEN TECHNOLOGY that surpasses shit we have today.
There are a lot of interesting and creative ways to portray Steve as a “man out of time”. I actually think the “I got that reference” quip in the movie was a perfect example of this?
Like, by all means have him be surprised about where how society has gone. I just want peopled to…. do….. actual research on what the situation in the US actually was in the time he’s from….

I’ve already reblogged this this because I think it sums up perfectly the history issues surrounding Steve…
I just wanted to add a link to PBS’s American Experience: The 1930s Collection. Unfortunately you have to be in the US to watch these films, but if you can watch them I highly recommend it. They cover a lot of different subjects from popular culture to economics and in particular I think Riding the Rails would be the most interesting to watch since it’s about teenagers right at the same time Steve would have been a young teen.
These documentaries might be useful in understanding the differences between someone who was a teenager during the Great Depression and the post-War era. 

Okay so I really happen to love meta like this because I think that Captain America — when written well — is a fascinating commentary on American culture. For a character that’s held up on face value to be this All-American, Square-Jawed, White Christian Crusader of All Things Good, he doesn’t do a very good job of it. He has a liberal arts background, he’s been radically anti-government for many periods over the years, he’s been shown to be supportive and sensitive to gay rights, some of his strongest friendships have been with women and PoC, people refer to him as “the mother” of the Avengers, he’s dealt with body image and self-esteem issues, and by far his longest and most valued relationship has been with another man. A man, by the way, that when born in an alternate reality as a woman, Captain America married. So take that as you will.
To the casual reader/viewer, Captain America looks like a cardboard cut-out conservative symbol for Good Old-Fashioned White American Justice. In reality, one could argue he struggles to represent (as hamfisted as the delivery may be, since comic book writers aren’t always the most culturally sensitive bunch) everything liberal American culture tries to incorporate in modern society. For a kid from Brooklyn from the 1930s, that’s quite a lot.


I love all this Cap meta in general, but also: children, educate yourselves about the fact that liberalism/progressiveness and civil protest movements in America did not suddenly start in the 60s, because that is an important and cool thing to know.

During the WWII years, there was very little that was said against the war or the President, mainly because we’d been pretty unified by Pearl Harbor and one way to get Americans to unite is to attack us. It was seen as unpatriotic and possibly even traitorous to speak out against the war — tho I’m sure there were people doing so.
There was plenty of sex and violence back then, but it wasn’t so much out in the open. It wasn’t on screen at the movie and out in public. I think Steve would be doing some serious double takes at some of the clothing that women are wearing today compared to what they’re wearing now.

This was considered a very racy picture at that time, and check out the swimsuit she’s wearing! Seeing a woman in a thong had to make Steve’s jaw drop. Even if he’s seen a woman’s ass before, it wasn’t out on the beach.
The technology would have to also give him pause. Yes, he’s seen some advanced tech, but…. that was 70 years ago. The fact that he can hold a computer in his hand — what’s a computer would be his first question — that can make phone calls, send messages, get information — all the things our phones can do — is going to make him stop and probably say “holy crap” because it’s the stuff of science fiction for him.
I really think Steve would be disappointed at a lot of the changes in our society and world. Partly due to the shock of sudden change, but also from conversations from people I know that lived during the 40’s. My grandmother’s sister was in her 20’s at that time and she does admit that there’s a lot of things that are for the better, but there’s some things that are just disappointing to her.
I don’t think Steve would be the naive, innocent babe in the woods that a lot of fanfic makes him out to be. He grew up during the depression, he’s seen hunger and illness and desperation. And being in battle, he’s seen blood and guts, people doing horrible things to each other, torture — everything you can imagine — the scene in Iron Man where Tony is bailing from the “funvee” and things are exploding all around him and bullets are flying and soldiers are dying — Steve would have understood and fit right in there. Tho the woman in combat would have thrown him off a bit. Or a lot.
It’s up to the writer to interpret Steve’s characterization, and as a reader we can back button or read on.

I’m too drunk to get into the rest so I’m just going to address this one part:
"Tho the woman in combat would have thrown him off a bit. Or a lot."
Yes, he was obviously thrown off. 
so

fucking

thrown

off

peggyleads:

maquisleader:

ihavealotoffeelings:

ykoriana:

magenmagenmagen:

chujo-hime:

cephiedvariable:

I feel a little asinine making a statement as broad and obvious as this, but the War changed the US and American culture substantially. Like, the US in 1939 was a very different place from the US in 1946. There was a shift in cultural values and political doctrine after WWII spurred on by the Cold War, justified by the oodles of money the country made off of weapons production and bolstered by the emerging popularity of television, which was used quite effectively as a tool of propaganda. I mean, a belief in American Imperialism had always been around in the US - as had theocratic Puritanical social mores - but their prominence in the late 40’s through to the early 60’s was not a progression of pre-War culture, but a reaction to America’s sudden position as THE Global Military and Economic Superpower.

The problem Avengers movie fandom seems to run into is that they place the cultural experience of Steve Rogers on the wrong side of the war. I’m guessing this is because people are generally more familiar with the atmosphere of post-War/50’s America due to a number of factors, from something as simple as the continued cultural relevance of 50’s pop media to the fact that the common historical narrative of the 20th century tends to place the 1960’s as the “radical turning point” in American culture, which often manages to undermine the radical movements of the five decades preceding it.

Long story short: I have found that Avengers fandom tends to portray Captain America’s “culture shock” in really weird ways, with him acting more like a sheltered kid from our modern conception of the 1950’s rather than someone who lived through the Great Depression, the New Deal, the rise of fascism in Europe, the various civil protest movements revolving around just about everything in American culture, the vicious public backlash against President Hoover… I mean, additionally there is the possibility that movie!Steve shares his 616 counterpart’s backstory as an art student, or at the very least was interested in art professionally (which the Cap movie did sort of cutely underline) and I just… cannot buy that an orphaned fine arts student living in New York of all places in the late 30’s/early 40’s would be at all ~shocked and appalled~ by the vast majority of modern social mores and allowances?? Like “oh no people have sex all the time in 2012??” “wow it’s so strange that people just get angry at the president all the time??” Those things were not uncommon in the 1940s.

Which covers “socially and politically”. As for technologically… well, yeah, things HAVE changed a lot, but that rapid change began during the time period he lived in. I mean, computers are crazy sure, but it’s kind of silly to think that 2012’s technology would be completely brain breaking to someone from the recent past. A significant period of adjustment might be required, but he’d probably catch on to things like Microwaves and word processing programs p. quickly. Especially since we aren’t even talking about the real past, here. We are talking about COMIC BOOK HISTORY in which Captain America fought Nazis who had CRAZY ALIEN TECHNOLOGY that surpasses shit we have today.

There are a lot of interesting and creative ways to portray Steve as a “man out of time”. I actually think the “I got that reference” quip in the movie was a perfect example of this?

Like, by all means have him be surprised about where how society has gone. I just want peopled to…. do….. actual research on what the situation in the US actually was in the time he’s from….

I’ve already reblogged this this because I think it sums up perfectly the history issues surrounding Steve…

I just wanted to add a link to PBS’s American Experience: The 1930s Collection. Unfortunately you have to be in the US to watch these films, but if you can watch them I highly recommend it. They cover a lot of different subjects from popular culture to economics and in particular I think Riding the Rails would be the most interesting to watch since it’s about teenagers right at the same time Steve would have been a young teen.

These documentaries might be useful in understanding the differences between someone who was a teenager during the Great Depression and the post-War era. 

Okay so I really happen to love meta like this because I think that Captain America — when written well — is a fascinating commentary on American culture. For a character that’s held up on face value to be this All-American, Square-Jawed, White Christian Crusader of All Things Good, he doesn’t do a very good job of it. He has a liberal arts background, he’s been radically anti-government for many periods over the years, he’s been shown to be supportive and sensitive to gay rights, some of his strongest friendships have been with women and PoC, people refer to him as “the mother” of the Avengers, he’s dealt with body image and self-esteem issues, and by far his longest and most valued relationship has been with another man. A man, by the way, that when born in an alternate reality as a woman, Captain America married. So take that as you will.

To the casual reader/viewer, Captain America looks like a cardboard cut-out conservative symbol for Good Old-Fashioned White American Justice. In reality, one could argue he struggles to represent (as hamfisted as the delivery may be, since comic book writers aren’t always the most culturally sensitive bunch) everything liberal American culture tries to incorporate in modern society. For a kid from Brooklyn from the 1930s, that’s quite a lot.

I love all this Cap meta in general, but also: children, educate yourselves about the fact that liberalism/progressiveness and civil protest movements in America did not suddenly start in the 60s, because that is an important and cool thing to know.

During the WWII years, there was very little that was said against the war or the President, mainly because we’d been pretty unified by Pearl Harbor and one way to get Americans to unite is to attack us. It was seen as unpatriotic and possibly even traitorous to speak out against the war — tho I’m sure there were people doing so.

There was plenty of sex and violence back then, but it wasn’t so much out in the open. It wasn’t on screen at the movie and out in public. I think Steve would be doing some serious double takes at some of the clothing that women are wearing today compared to what they’re wearing now.

image

This was considered a very racy picture at that time, and check out the swimsuit she’s wearing! Seeing a woman in a thong had to make Steve’s jaw drop. Even if he’s seen a woman’s ass before, it wasn’t out on the beach.

The technology would have to also give him pause. Yes, he’s seen some advanced tech, but…. that was 70 years ago. The fact that he can hold a computer in his hand — what’s a computer would be his first question — that can make phone calls, send messages, get information — all the things our phones can do — is going to make him stop and probably say “holy crap” because it’s the stuff of science fiction for him.

I really think Steve would be disappointed at a lot of the changes in our society and world. Partly due to the shock of sudden change, but also from conversations from people I know that lived during the 40’s. My grandmother’s sister was in her 20’s at that time and she does admit that there’s a lot of things that are for the better, but there’s some things that are just disappointing to her.

I don’t think Steve would be the naive, innocent babe in the woods that a lot of fanfic makes him out to be. He grew up during the depression, he’s seen hunger and illness and desperation. And being in battle, he’s seen blood and guts, people doing horrible things to each other, torture — everything you can imagine — the scene in Iron Man where Tony is bailing from the “funvee” and things are exploding all around him and bullets are flying and soldiers are dying — Steve would have understood and fit right in there. Tho the woman in combat would have thrown him off a bit. Or a lot.

It’s up to the writer to interpret Steve’s characterization, and as a reader we can back button or read on.

I’m too drunk to get into the rest so I’m just going to address this one part:

"Tho the woman in combat would have thrown him off a bit. Or a lot."

Yes, he was obviously thrown off. 

so

fucking

thrown

off

(via blakefancier)